Society for Linguistic Anthropology

"Linguistic Anthropology is the comparative study of the ways in which language shapes social life. It explores the many ways in which practices of language use shape patterns of communication, formulate categories of social identity and group membership, organize large-scale cultural beliefs and ideologies, and, in conjunction with other semiotic practices, equip people with common cultural representations of their natural and social worlds. If you are interested in studying linguistic anthropology, be sure to visit our directory of linguistic anthropology programs.

The Society for Linguistic Anthropology (SLA) is a section of the American Anthropological Association (AAA). To join the SLA, pelase register via the AAA website. Membership entitles you to a complementary subscription to the Journal of Linguistic Anthropology. In addition to this website and blog, we also maintain several e-mail lists, organize academic meetings and award prizes for outstanding work in the discipline. See here for a list of officers and the by-laws of the SLA. If you’d like to contact the SLA, please use our contact form.”

-From the “About the SLA



Understanding Race

Looking through the eyes of history, science and lived experience, the RACE Project explains differences among people and reveals the reality – and unreality – of race.  The story of race is complex and may challenge how we think about race and human variation, about the differences and similarities among people.

-From the “About the Project



American Anthropological Association

Founded in 1902, the American Anthropological Association (AAA) is the world’s largest organization of individuals interested in anthropology. Although there were several other American anthropological societies in existence at the turn of the 20th century, this new, national organization was formed “to promote the science of anthropology, to stimulate and coordinate the efforts of American anthropologists, to foster local and other societies devoted to anthropology, to serve as a bond among American anthropologists and anthropologic[al] organizations present and prospective, and to publish and encourage the publication of matter pertaining to anthropology” (AAA Articles of Incorporation). At its incorporation, the Association also assumed responsibility for the American Anthropologist, which was originally begun in 1888 by the Anthropological Society of Washington (ASW). By 1905, the journal also served the American Ethnological Society, in addition to the AAA and ASW.

- From the “About AAA